Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is Nitric Oxide?
  2. What is the difference between NO and nitrous oxide and nitroglycerin?
  3. How are these products delivering nitric oxide to the system?
  4. Is there proof that nitric oxide works?
  5. Why must my horse have an empty stomach?
  6. How can I be sure my horse has an empty stomach?
  7. How do I dose?
  8. How do I accurately estimate my horse's weight?
  9. What if I put the dose in feed or my horse eats a little?
  10. Where can I find a muzzle?
  11. I have a small pony, how do I find a muzzle to fit her?
  12. I need the muzzle now, and do not have time to wait for one to arrive mail order.
  13. What do I do if my horse sneaks feed in through the sides of the muzzle?
  14. Can my horse have water?
  15. What is a nitric oxide inhibitor?
  16. What drugs/herbs are nitric oxide inhibitors?
  17. What are the effects of other drugs when given in conjunction with nitric oxide delivering products?
  18. How long does each dose last?
  19. Can I premix my dose for later in the day?
  20. Will the slurry stain my clothes?
  21. The vet wants my horse on antibiotics, can he also be on nitric oxide delivering products?
  22. Why is my horse not responding?
  23. If I fast my horse in the morning while others are eating she will tear the barn down, what can I do?
  24. After a few uses, my 60cc syringe is sticking and making it hard to push the product in.
  25. A 60cc syringe is too large for my hand to comfortably push in.
  26. After an hour of fasting, my horse still had some tiny bits of feed in her mouth:
  27. Where can I learn more about nitric oxide?
  28. Can I give vitamins?
  29. My horse has laminitis and she was responding great to the product, then I turned her out, now she is worse.
    What happened?
  30. What is the best footing for a laminitic horse?
  31. Can my laminitis horse have treats?
  32. When can my laminitis horse go back outside?
  33. Where can I learn more about laminitis to help my horse?
  34. Do these products lower blood pressure?
  35. Why do you sell GluChon MSM-C when it's formula contains nitric oxide inhibitors?
  1. What is Nitric Oxide?

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a colorless, radical-free gas that reacts rapidly with oxygen to form other nitrogen oxides, and ultimately is converted to nitrite and nitrate; It is a gaseous mediator of cell-to-cell communication and potent vasodilator, formed from L-Arginine in bone, brain, endothelium, granulocytes, pancreatic beta cells, and peripheral nerves by a constitutive nitric oxide synthase, and in hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, macrophages, and smooth muscle by inducible nitric oxide synthase. NO may be the first known retrograde neurotransmitter.

    The nitric oxide molecule is a product of various tissues and plays a role in various processes. Nitric oxide (NO) is elaborated by endothelium, which is identical to endothelium-derived relaxing factor, dilates vessels by relaxing vascular smooth muscle; nitrites used in coronary and peripheral vascular disease induce or mimic this action.

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology was awarded to 3 U.S. pharmacologists, Robert F. Furchgott, Ferid Murad, and Louis J. Ignarro, for their independent discoveries of the role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular physiology.

    In the immune system, macrophages use NO as a cytotoxic agent. Deficiency or inactivation of NO may contribute to the pathogenesis of both hypertension and atherosclerosis. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary 27th edition)

  2. What is the difference between NO and nitrous oxide and nitroglycerin?

    Nitric oxide is defined above.

    Nitrous oxide: A colorless, odorless gas used as an anesthetic and analgesic. It is a nonflammable, non-explosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a rapidly acting; rapidly reversible, non-depressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary 27th Edition)

    Nitroglycerin: An explosive yellowish oily fluid formed by the action of sulphuric and nitric acids on glycerin. It is used as a vasodilator, especially in angina pectoris patients. Nitroglycerin generates nitric oxide. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary 27th Edition)

  3. How are these products delivering nitric oxide to the system?

    These products supply the precursors (raw materials) that the body uses to manufacture nitric oxide. These are stored in the smooth muscle (lining of blood vessels) and produce nitric oxide upon demand. Without sufficient precursors, the body cannot produce sufficient nitric oxide.

  4. Is there proof that nitric oxide works?

    There are hundreds of books and many thousands of research papers written about the benefits of nitric oxide.

  5. Why must my horse have an empty stomach?

    Feed in the stomach upsets the synergy of the ingredients, rendering it weak. With no food in the stomach, there will be an insulin reaction in the small intestine delivering the full dosage immediately into the bloodstream.

  6. How can I be sure my horse has an empty stomach?

    You must fast the horse for 1 hour before, and 1 hour after dosing. This is a routine that each owner must find will work best for them.

    1. If your horse cleans up all his feed, every morsel, dose 1st thing in the AM, then wait 1 hour and feed as you normally do.
    2. Place the horse in an empty stall with a clean swept floor for the 2 hour fasting period.
    3. Safely tie the horse. Make sure you do not force any horse to stand tied, who is in great pain like a laminitic horse, or horse with serious musculoskeletal problems.
    4. Have the horse wear a muzzle. Some horses quickly learn how to sneak feed in through the holes; make sure yours is not able to do this.
    5. If your horse is able to be worked, use his grooming/exercise and cooling out time, as part of the 2 hour fasting period. Simply dose after the first hour, and continue as you were.
    6. If you only have one window in your day when you can dose, but need at least 2 doses in: After the first dose is given, 1 1/2 hours later dose again, then fast one last hour. Each dose lasts 1 1/2 to 3 hours depending on each horses needs. By compounding them this way, some have a very good result.
  7. How do I dose?

    Dosage is 3cc per 100 lbs. body weight. This is 30cc for a 1,000 pound horse. (*Pony's, minis and donkeys normal dose is 6cc powder per 100 lbs. body weight. This is required due to their metabolism.)

    When you open up a 60cc oral dosing syringe, place your finger over the bottom so powder can not spill out. Measure your dose by filling to the cc's on the syringe. The scoop in the bottle holds approx. 28.9cc powder.

    Add water a little at a time, and mix with a butter knife to make a slurry. The amount of water does not matter; add what you need to get the consistency that is easiest for you to give to your horse.

    Put the syringe back together. Use something narrow to push the powder in the tip in.

    Place syringe gently into the corner of the horse's mouth, and squirt it onto his tongue slowly as he swallows.

    If he is reluctant to swallow, gently tickle his tongue with the syringe and when he starts to work his tongue, then slowly squirt and he will swallow.

  8. How do I accurately estimate my horse's weight?

    Equation is: Heartgirth X heartgirth X Body length, Divided by 330 = estimated body weight

    Measure with a regular measuring tape from point of shoulder to point of buttocks. Then measure completely around the heartgirth, just behind the front legs over the highest point of the withers. Multiply heartgirth x 2, and then multiply length by that, then divide total by 330. The answer should be within 24 lbs. of the horse's actual body weight. Horses who are pregnant, or are conformationally unbalanced will be more difficult to get an accurate reading.

    Texas A&M published a study with this body weight equation. In one Florida study they found when only visual observation was used, 88% of the horses were underestimated in their actual weight. The horse's average weight was underestimated by an average of 186 lbs.

  9. What if I put the dose in feed or my horse eats a little?

    This product can not be given with any feed. If he eats even 1 mouthful of feed, your dose will be wasted because it will not be able to work.

  10. Where can I find a muzzle?

    Stateline tack has a plastic one that works fairly well, most horses can not get feed through it, but some still can shove feed through the holes in the sides. KV Vet supply has a wire one that is more comfortable, but some horses will be able to get hay through the holes in the wire. Prices range from $22 -$32. It is best to remove as much hay as possible while the horse is muzzled to avoid frustrating the horse, or him maneuvering hay into the muzzle to eat.

  11. I have a small pony, how do I find a muzzle to fit her?

    Stateline tack has a small wire one for minis. They can get hay through the wire if they try. We have found the larger horse size plastic muzzle works fine on a small pony if you tie a soft shoelace on the top of the muzzle to hold it in place, so it does not slip off the pony's nose. They might be able to get hay through the holes, but will have a harder time reaching it.

  12. I need the muzzle now, and do not have time to wait for one to arrive mail order:

    You can make one using a plastic gallon milk jug. These tend to not be very strong, and if you can find a stronger plastic, like a gallon mineral oil container, it will last longer. Make very certain that you make it as comfortable and breathable as possible. Make many holes for easy breathing, drinking and drainage. Cut holes to tie onto the halter on 4 equal sides, including bottom and top. Tie with shoelaces. Make certain the horse is comfortable and can breathe easily, and it does not cause him undo stress. Do not use any container that has contained any harmful substances. Thoroughly clean and dry the container you do use.

  13. What do I do if my horse sneaks feed in through the sides of the muzzle?

    This is a horse that will need to be placed into a stall with a clean floor, or tied, or you will have to try and find a comfortable muzzle where it is impossible for her to get feed through it. Sneaking little bits of feed only wastes the dose given.

  14. Can my horse have water?

    Absolutely, never withhold water from any horse. Just make sure it is clean and fresh, and does not have any additives that will prevent the product from working.

  15. What is a nitric oxide inhibitor?

    Any substance, drug, or herb that blocks nitric oxide formation. These will not allow nitric oxide delivering products to work.

  16. What drugs/herbs are nitric oxide inhibitors?

    The list is very long. Basically any drug or herb or substance that is an anti inflammatory will be a nitric oxide inhibitor. Bute, banamine, ketoprophen, tetracycline's, glucosamine, MSM, chondroitin sulfate, Devils claw, yucca and Dexamethasone, (Azium) are a few very common nitric oxide inhibitors. If you have a question about any drug or substance, please call the office or email and we will get an answer for you.

  17. What are the effects of other drugs when given in conjunction with nitric oxide delivering products?

    Since nitric oxide is a vasodilator, it will enhance any other substances that are given to the horse. Do not give sedatives (ace, rompun, (xylazine), dormosedan, etc.), concurrently when giving a nitric oxide delivering product. These and others like narcotics will be greatly intensified. Wait at least 6 hours after dosing with these products before giving a drug or substance like a sedative, anesthetic, narcotic, etc.

  18. How long does each dose last?

    1 1/2 to 3 hours in the horses system. This is why dosing frequently, even as often as every 3-4 hours many times brings excellent results very quickly.

  19. Can I premix my dose for later in the day?

    No, please mix and dose immediately. The dose will loose its potency if it is pre mixed.

    Make certain the bottle is stored in a cool dry place with the lid on tight.

  20. Will the slurry stain my clothes?

    Yes, wear something you do not mind getting dirty. It is better to mix your dose outside in the barn, instead of in your kitchen in case of spills.

  21. The vet wants my horse on antibiotics, can he also be on nitric oxide delivering products?

    Yes, as long as you are not using tetracycline's, give the antibiotics as the vet recommends, and then dose with the nitric oxide delivering products an hour later.

  22. Why is my horse not responding?

    The most common reasons for poor response are:

    1. The horse's stomach is not empty at the time of dosing, or is allowed to eat too soon after dosing.
    2. The dosage is not enough for this particular horse's condition. Some horses with severe problems require double dosing and more frequent dosing at the beginning.
    3. The horse is receiving a nitric oxide inhibitor, and this will not allow the product to be effective.
    4. Because of their metabolism, ponies, minis and donkeys require 6cc powder per 100 lbs bodyweight as their normal dose. Double dosing for one of these little guys is 12cc per 100 lbs. body weight.
    5. It is crucial to have a veterinarian's diagnosis, and correctly address the whole problem. If other very important factors are not being addressed, then your horse's chances of a complete recovery are greatly reduced. Nitric oxide is a very crucial part of the the body's own healing process, but antibiotics, proper bandaging techniques, wound care, farrier care, etc. depending on the horses problem are all necessary if your treating veterinarian prescribes them.
  23. If I fast my horse in the morning while others are eating she will tear the barn down, what can I do?

    Feed her along with the others, and later in the morning after she has finished, fast her for the 2 hour period and dose after the first hour. Or, dose her 1 hour before you normally feed all the horses, then she will be able to eat with the others.

  24. After a few uses, my 60cc syringe is sticking and making it hard to push the product in.

    At the very beginning, before and after dosing, dip the rubber stopper into mineral oil to keep it running smooth. After a time the rubber stopper will begin to swell and it will become necessary to replace the syringe.

  25. A 60cc syringe is too large for my hand to comfortably push in.

    Use a smaller 35cc syringe and just mix 1/2 of your dose at a time. Make sure you have made the hole larger at the end, so it is easier to push the slurry through.

  26. After an hour of fasting, my horse still had some tiny bits of feed in her mouth:

    Some horses can stand there for an hour and just hold a little feed in their mouth, like a kid with a gumball. Before you mix your dose, flush the mouth out with water from your syringe, and make sure she didn't swallow any bits. Then go ahead and dose.

  27. Where can I learn more about nitric oxide?

    There are many hundreds of books and thousands of research papers written about nitric oxide, since research is being conducted constantly and new developments are being recorded it is important to understand that some information may be outdated.

    Some excellent books are:

    • "The Arginine Solution" by Robert Fried, PhD and Woodson C. Merrill, MD
    • "Nitric Oxide in Health and Disease" by Lincoln, Hoyle, and Burnstock
    • "Nitric Oxide in Bone and Joint Disease" by Hukkanen, Polak, and Hughes

    Also, over the internet:

  28. Can I give vitamins?

    Yes, as long as they do not contain any ingredients that are nitric oxide inhibitors, they are fine to give when you are normally feeding your horse. Just do not feed anything while you are doing your fasting.

  29. My horse has laminitis and she was responding great to the product, then I turned her out, now she is worse. What happened?

    Even though the horse has responded very well to the product, feels better and you feel she can be turned out again; it is crucial to remember that the horse has sustained damage to the lamina. Some horses only sustain a little, some much more, every horse is different. Even if the horse's coffin bone has not rotated, the lamina is still damaged and needs time to improve. Turning the horse out too soon, will only cause more damage to occur, and worsen your horse's chances of the best recovery possible. Only allow your horse to begin exercising again when your treating veterinarian has given the OK. If your horse has any little setbacks, take them seriously, and begin aggressive treatment again before more damage occurs. The laminitic horse should continue on the product throughout the body's healing process. This will lessen any chances of reoccurrences, and speed up the recovery time.

  30. What is the best footing for a laminitic horse?

    Soft level deeply bedded. Using layers of shavings/straw/shavings and banked thick on the sides of the stall makes a comfortable bed for the laminitic horse. Using sand, 6-8" deep is also desirable. Make certain your horse does not eat sand or straw with either of these choices, (colic is not what the laminitic horse needs to contend with). What is most important is the horse needs to be able to place his feet in the best position of comfort, usually they choose to point their toes downward, to relieve pressure from the deep digital flexor tendon pulling on the coffin bone.

  31. Can my laminitis horse have treats?

    Yes, a horse suffering from laminitis should receive lots of love and comfort food. But make certain they are reasonable, and do not give anything to excess. Do not give a horse suffering from laminitis sweet feed or other grain, it can worsen his condition. Giving little mashes with carrots and apples are greatly appreciated. Peppermints are loved by some horses too.

  32. When can my laminitic horse go back outside?

    When your veterinarian gives the OK, and you must still be very cautious. Start very slow, with controlled hand walking on soft level ground, and no sharp turns. Be extra observant and diligent about checking for signs of pain or even mild discomfort. Check for digital pulses, and make sure your horse is improved enough to not have a reoccurrence. Laminitic horses can be 100% cured, but much time, patience, and diligent hard work many times has to be taken, for a full recovery.

  33. Where can I learn more about laminitis to help my horse?

    We are in the process of writing a very helpful article about laminitis. Please look on the site for it, or email with any questions and we will do all we can to help.

    There are several excellent books available on laminitis:

    • "Understanding Laminitis" by Ric Redden DVM
    • "Explaining Laminitis and it's Prevention" by Robert A. Eustace BVSc Cert. E.O. Cert. E.P. MRCVS
    • "All About Laminitis" by Karen Coumbe MRCVS.

    Learning as much as you can about his devastating disease process is priceless if you ever have to deal with this problem.

  34. Do these products lower blood pressure?

    Yes, nitric oxide relaxes the walls of the veins and arteries and causes vasodilation, and does reduce the systemic blood pressure. Very rarely a horse will normally have a low blood pressure, and after giving a very large, usually a double dose of one of these products can cause the horse to become very relaxed, and appear somewhat sedated. This is a very rare occurrence, and this horse would be one who would need a smaller dose of the product.

  35. Why do you sell GluChon MSM-C when it's formula contains nitric oxide inhibitors?

    Reign Supreme recognizes the need for an excellent joint supplement. Yes, it does contain nitric oxide inhibitors, and therefore could not be used in conjunction with any of our nitric oxide delivering products. The key differences in Reign Supreme's GluChon MSM-C formula and others on the market are not only on the quality and strengths of each key ingredient, but also very importantly in the delivery system. GluChon MSM-C is absorbed into the bloodstream, instead of through the digestive tract like other oral fed joint supplements. The way GluChon MSM-C is absorbed into the bloodstream allows the horse to benefit from 100% of the ingredients given. Other joint supplements that are absorbed through the digestive tract only allow the horse to benefit from 1/5 to 1/4 of the given ingredients.